суббота, 28 февраля 2009 г.

The Brave New World: A History of Early America



The Brave New World: A History of Early America

by Peter Charles Hoffer

The Brave New World covers the span of early American history, from 30,000 years before Europeans ever landed on North American shores to creation of the new nation. With its exploration of the places and peoples of early America, this comprehensive, lively narrative brings together the most recent scholarship on the colonial and revolutionary eras, Native Americans, slavery, politics, war, and the daily lives of ordinary people. The revised, enlarged edition includes a new chapter carrying the story through the American Revolution, the War for Independence, and the creation of the Confederation. Additional material on the frontier, the Southwest and the Caribbean, the slave trade, religion, science and technology, and ecology broadens the text, and maps drawn especially for this edition will enable readers to follow the story more closely. The bibliographical essay, one of the most admired features of the first edition, has been expanded and brought up to date.
Peter Charles Hoffer combines the Atlantic Rim scholarship with a Continental perspective, illuminating early America from all angles -- from its first settlers to the Spanish Century, from African slavery to the Salem witchcraft cases, from prayer and drinking practices to the development of complex economies, from the colonies' fight for freedom to an infant nation's struggle for political and economic legitimacy. Wide-ranging in scope, inclusive in content, the revised edition of The Brave New World continues to provide professors, students, and historians with an engaging and accessible history of early North America.

The Cambridge Companion to the Greek and Roman Novel



The Cambridge Companion to the Greek and Roman Novel

The Greek and Roman novels of Petronius, Apuleius, Longus, Heliodorus and others have been cherished for millennia, but never more so than now. The Cambridge Companion to the Greek and Roman Novel contains nineteen original essays by an international cast of experts in the field. The emphasis is upon the critical interpretation of the texts within historical settings, both in antiquity and in the later generations that have been and continue to be inspired by them. All the central issues of current scholarship are addressed: sexuality, cultural identity, class, religion, politics, narrative, style, readership and much more. Four sections cover cultural context of the novels, their contents, literary form, and their reception in classical antiquity and beyond. Each chapter includes guidance on further reading. This collection will be essential for scholars and students, as well as for others who want an up-to-date, accessible introduction into this exhilarating material.

The Cambridge Companion to Greek Tragedy



The Cambridge Companion to Greek Tragedy (Cambridge Companions to Literature)

by P. E. Easterling (Editor)

Looking at ancient Greek tragedy in the context of late-20th-century reading, criticism and performance, seven distinguished scholars examine tragedy as an institution in the civic life of ancient Athens; a range of approaches to the surviving plays; and changing patterns of reception, adaptation, and performance, from antiquity to the present. 31 photos.

Lorenzo de' Medici and the Art of Magnificence




Lorenzo de' Medici and the Art of Magnificence (The Johns Hopkins Symposia in Comparative History)

by F. W. Kent


In the past half century scholars have downplayed the significance of Lorenzo de' Medici (1449--1492), called "the Magnificent," as a patron of the arts. Less wealthy than his grandfather Cosimo, the argument goes, Lorenzo was far more interested in collecting ancient objects of art than in commissioning contemporary art or architecture. His earlier reputation as a patron was said to be largely a construct of humanist exaggeration and partisan deference.
Although some recent studies have taken issue with this view, no synthesis of Lorenzo as art patron and art lover has yet emerged. In Lorenzo de' Medici and the Art of Magnificence historian F. W. Kent offers a new look at Lorenzo's relationship to the arts, aesthetics, collecting, and building -- especially in the context of his role as the political boss (maestro della bottega) of republican Florence and a leading player in Renaissance Italian diplomacy. As a result of this approach, which pays careful attention to the events of his short but dramatic life, a radically new chronology of Lorenzo's activities as an art patron emerges, revealing them to have been more extensive and creative than previously thought. Kent's Lorenzo was broadly interested in the arts and supported efforts to beautify Florence and the many Medici lands and palaces. His expertise was well regarded by guildsmen and artists, who often turned to him for advice as well as for patronage. Lorenzo himself was educated in the arts by such men, and Kent explores his aesthetic education and taste, taking into account what is known of Lorenzo's patronage of music and manuscripts, and of his own creative work as a major Quattrocento poet.
Richly illustrated with photographs of Medici landmarks by Ralph Lieberman, Lorenzo de' Medici and the Art of Magnificence offers a masterful portrait of Lorenzo as a man whose achievements might have rivaled his grandfather's had he not died so young.

вторник, 24 февраля 2009 г.

The Political Unconscious



The Political Unconscious

by Fredric Jameson

In this ground-breaking and influential study Fredric Jameson explores the complex place and function of literature within culture. At the time Jameson was actually writing the book, in the mid to late seventies, there was a major reaction against deconstruction and poststructuralism. As one of the most significant literary theorists, Jameson found himself in the unenviable position of wanting to defend his intellectual past yet keep an eye on the future. With this book he carried it off beautifully. A landmark publication, The Political Unconscious takes its place as one of the most meaningful works of the twentieth century. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Eros, Wisdom, and Silence: Plato's Erotic Dialogues



Eros, Wisdom, and Silence: Plato's Erotic Dialogues (Eric Voegelin Institute Series in Political Philosophy)

by James M Rhodes

Eros, Wisdom, and Silence is a close reading of Plato's Seventh Letter and his dialogues Symposium and Phaedrus, with significant attention also given to Alcibiades I. A book about love, James Rhodes's work was conceived as a conversation and meant to be read side by side with Plato's works and those of his worthy interlocutors. It invites lovers to participate in conversations that move their souls to love, and it also invites the reader to take part in the author's dialogues with Plato and his commentators.

Fifty Key Literary Theorists



Fifty Key Literary Theorists (Kindle Edition)

by Richard J.Lane

Covering over a century's worth of debate, thinking and writing about literature, this is a unique guide to the lives and works of fifty theorists who have left an indelible mark on the way we all experience literary works. Featuring theorists such as Judith Butler, Jacques Derrida, Sigmund Freud and Edward Said, this accessible guide includes: · a glossary of terms · full cross-referencing for maximum ease of use · authoritative guides to further reading on and by each theorist. An essential resource for all students of literature, Fifty Key Literary Theorists explores the gamut of critical debate, from the New Critics to the Deconstructionists, and from post-colonialism to post-Marxism and more.

понедельник, 23 февраля 2009 г.

Kierkegaard: A Biography



Kierkegaard: A Biography

by Alastair Hannay

Written by one of the world's preeminent authorities on Kierkegard, this biography is the first to reveal the delicate imbrication of Kierkegard's life and thought. To grasp the importance and influence of Kierkegaard's thought far beyond his native Denmark, it is necessary to trace the many factors that led this gifted but (according to his headmaster) 'exceedingly childish youth' to grapple with traditional philosophical problems and religious themes in a way that later generations would recognize as amounting to a philosophical revolution. Although Kierkegaard's works are widely tapped and cited they are seldom placed in context. Nor is due attention placed to their chronology. However, perhaps more than the work of any other contributor to the Western philosophical tradition, these writings are so closely meshed with the background and details of the author's life that knowledge of this is indispensible to their content. Alastair Hannay solves these problems by following the chronological sequence of events and focusing on the formative stages of his career from the success of his first, pseudonymous work ^Either/Or through to The Sickness Unto Death and Practice in Christianity. This book offers a powerful narrative account which will be of particular interest to philosophers, literary theorists, intellectual historians, and scholars of religious studies as well as any non-specialist looking for an authoritative guide to the life and work of one of the most original and fascinating figures in Western philosophy. Alastair Hannay is Professor Emeritus in the department of philosophy at the University of Oslo. He is the co-editor of The Cambridge Companion of Kierkegaard (1998) and is also translator of several works by Kierkegaard in Penguin Classics.

The Essential Pope Benedict XVI: His Central Writings and Speeches



The Essential Pope Benedict XVI: His Central Writings and Speeches

by John F. Thornton, Susan B. Varenne (Authors)

On April 24, 2005, Cardinal Joseph Alois Ratzinger became Pope Benedict XVI, the twenty-first-century successor of the Apostle Peter and the spiritual leader of more than one billion Roman Catholics. Who is this complex man whose office grants him sole charge of the world's largest religion? How will his tenure influence the future? The Essential Pope Benedict XVI answers these questions through carefully chosen selections from his homilies, interviews, theological essays, and articles on the crises facing the church today. This collection lays out Benedict's thinking and relates it to a variety of contemporary issues, including modern culture's abandonment of traditional religious values, social mores regarding conception and the sanctity of life, current challenges to the priesthood, and the Catholic Church's tenuous relations with other world religions.
First a brilliant peritus, or "expert advisor," to the Second Vatican Council and then archbishop of Munich, Joseph Ratzinger was appointed head of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith by Pope John Paul II in 1981. As Cardinal Ratzinger, the ex officio defender of church doctrine, he gained a reputation as a heroic guardian of the faith for conservatives and was held in suspicion by church liberals.
We cannot yet know what issues and events will define the reign of Pope Benedict XVI, but by any measure he will be seen as one of the most important theological voices of our time. This one volume is the best source for understanding the heart, soul, and agenda of this twenty-first-century successor to St. Peter.

Indo-European Poetry and Myth



Indo-European Poetry and Myth

by M. L. West

The Indo-Europeans, speakers of the prehistoric parent language from which most European and some Asiatic languages are descended, most probably lived on the Eurasian steppes some five or six thousand years ago. Martin West investigates their traditional mythologies, religions, and poetries, and points to elements of common heritage. In The East Face of Helicon (1997), West showed the extent to which Homeric and other early Greek poetry was influenced by Near Eastern traditions, mainly non-Indo-European. His new book presents a foil to that work by identifying elements of more ancient, Indo-European heritage in the Greek material. Topics covered include the status of poets and poetry in Indo-European societies; meter, style, and diction; gods and other supernatural beings, from Father Sky and Mother Earth to the Sun-god and his beautiful daughter, the Thunder-god and other elemental deities, and earthly orders such as Nymphs and Elves; the forms of hymns, prayers, and incantations; conceptions about the world, its origin, mankind, death, and fate; the ideology of fame and of immortalization through poetry; the typology of the king and the hero; the hero as warrior, and the conventions of battle narrative.

воскресенье, 22 февраля 2009 г.

Demosthenes, Speeches 50-59



Demosthenes, Speeches 50-59 (The Oratory of Classical Greece)

by Victor Bers (Translator)

This is the sixth volume in the Oratory of Classical Greece. This series presents all of the surviving speeches from the late fifth and fourth centuries BC in new translations prepared by classical scholars who are at the forefront of the discipline. These translations are especially designed for the needs and interests of today's undergraduates, Greekless scholars in other disciplines, and the general public. Classical oratory is an invaluable resource for the study of ancient Greek life and culture. The speeches offer evidence on Greek moral views, social and economic conditions, political and social ideology, law and legal procedure, and other aspects of Athenian culture that have been largely ignored: women and family life, slavery, and religion, to name just a few. Demosthenes is regarded as the greatest orator of classical antiquity; indeed, his very eminence may be responsible for the inclusion under his name of a number of speeches he almost certainly did not write. This volume contains four speeches that are most probably the work of Apollodorus, who is often known as "the Eleventh Attic Orator." Regardless of their authorship, however, this set of ten law court speeches gives a vivid sense of public and private life in fourth-century BC Athens. They tell of the friendships and quarrels of rural neighbors, of young men joined in raucous, intentionally shocking behavior, of families enduring great poverty, and of the intricate involvement of prostitutes in the lives of citizens. They also deal with the outfitting of warships, the grain trade, challenges to citizenship, and restrictions on the civic role of men in debt to the state.

The Rise of Eurocentrism



The Rise of Eurocentrism

by Vassilis Lambropoulos

In the controversy over political correctness, the canon, and the curriculum, the role of Western tradition in a post-modern world is often debated. To clarify what is at stake, Vassilis Lambropoulos traces the ideology of European culture from the Reformation, focusing on a key element of Western tradition: the act of interpretation as a distinct practice of understanding and a civil right. Championed by Protestants insisting on independent interpretation of scripture, this ideal of autonomy ushered in the era of modernity with its essentialist philosophy of universal man and his aesthetic understanding of the world. After explaining the dominance of European culture through the combined archetypes of Hebraism (reason and morality) and Hellenism (spirit and art), Lambropoulos shows how the rule of autonomy has been transformed into the aesthetic, disinterested contemplation of things in themselves. Arguing that it is time to restore the socio-political dimension to the movement of autonomy, he proposes that a genealogy of the Hebraic-Hellenic archetypes can help us evaluate more recent models--like the Afrocentric one--and redefine the controversy surrounding education, Eurocentrism, and cultural politics.

The Social Roots of Basque Nationalism



The Social Roots of Basque Nationalism (The Basque Series)

by Alfonso Pérez-Agote
The Basque people have preserved their ethnic identity and sense of themselves as a separate community despite centuries of repression, diaspora, and economic and social upheaval—one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of that phenomenon we call nationalism. In The Social Roots of Basque Nationalism, sociologist Alfonso Pérez-Agote addresses the social mechanisms that Basques employed to sustain their ethnic identity under the Franco Regime and demonstrates how persecution actually encouraged the extension of Basque nationalist consciousness. He also reveals how state political pressure radicalized one element of the Basque-nationalist movement, resulting in the formation of eta ,an armed terrorist wing that itself became a mechanism for extending nationalist consciousness. Finally, he examines the subsequent changes in Basque nationalism following Franco's death and the extension of democracy in Spain, which resulted in the institutionalization of the movement into an autonomous political power. This work is based in part on a wide range of interviews and polls with informants in the Basque Country and abroad, eliciting such data as the role that family, education, social contacts, and religious environment play in the evolution of political attitudes; the place of violence in the Basque world view and contemporary political culture; regional variations in Basque nationalism; and the factors that contributed to the resilience of Basque nationalism in adapting to new historical conditions. The result is a sophisticated discussion of the various ways in which Basque social reality is constituted and how this reality helps to create political culture. Because Pérez-Agote situates his discussion within the broader frameworks of ethnic identity, group dynamics, and the nature of nationalism, the book makes a significant contribution not only to our understanding of the Basques but to the broader study of the evolution of nationalism and the nation-state, political violence, and the complicated transition of any society from dictatorship to democracy.

Encyclopedia of Society and Culture in the Ancient World




Encyclopedia of Society and Culture in the Ancient World (Encyclopedia of Society & Culture in the Ancient World)

by Peter I. Bogucki (Editor)


The four-volume "Encyclopedia of Society and Culture in the Ancient World" offers comprehensive coverage of the ancient world, from prehistory to the fall of Rome, including Western and non-Western cultures and civilizations. An introduction outlines the key milestones in the development of human society, from the peoples of the Ice Age whose way of life was so vastly different from ours to the citizens of Greece and Rome whom we easily recognize from history books. The 69 signed entries - including 14 on "major" topics with more in-depth coverage - provide readers with an overview of the various ways in which people lived in the past.Each entry explores a specific topic across the entire world, beginning with an introduction that outlines the major developments in chronological sequence, followed by subsections on the following centers of civilization: Africa, Egypt, the Middle East, Asia and the Pacific, Europe, Greece, Rome, and the Americas. Each entry concludes with a list of "see also" references to related entries, followed by a further reading list of books, articles, and Web sites on the topic. Primary source documents, sidebars, and more than 250 black-and-white photographs and maps supplement the text. A glossary, general bibliography, chronology by region, and comprehensive index make this set an easy-to-use and essential reference for high school and college students, researchers, and general readers alike.

Greek Colonisation



Greek Colonisation: An Account of Greek Colonies and Other Settlements Overseas (Mnemosyne Bibliotheca Classica Batava)

by Gocha R. Tsetskhladze (Editor)

This 3-volume handbook is dedicated to one of the most significant processes in the history of ancient Greece - colonisation. Greeks set up colonies and other settlements in new environments, establishing themselves in lands stretching from the Iberian Peninsula in the west to North Africa in the south and the Black Sea in the north-east. In this colonial world Greek and local societies met, influenced and enriched each other. The handbook brings together historians and archaeologists, all world experts, to present the latest ideas and evidence. The principal aim is to present and update the general picture of this phenomenon, showing its importance in the history of the whole ancient world, including the Near East. This work is dedicated to the late Prof. A. J. Graham. This second volume contains chapters on Central Greece on the eve of the colonisation movement, foundation stories, colonisation in the Classical period, the Adriatic, the northern Aegean, Libya and Cyprus.

среда, 18 февраля 2009 г.

Plato's Symposium



Plato's Symposium (Oxford Approaches to Classical Literature)

by Richard Hunter

Oxford Approaches to Classical Literature (Series Editors: Kathleen Coleman and Richard Rutherford) introduces individual works of Greek and Latin literature to readers who are approaching them for the first time. Each volume sets the work in its literary and historical context, and aims to offer a balanced and engaging assessment of its content, artistry, and purpose. A brief survey of the influence of the work upon subsequent generations is included to demonstrate its enduring relevance and power. All quotations from the original are translated into English.Plato's Symposium tells of a dinner party at a crucial point in Athenian history at which the guests decide that they will each in turn deliver a speech in praise of love. The humorous and brilliant work that follows points the way towards all Western thinking about love. The Symposium is also one of Plato's most sophisticated meditations on the practice of philosophy. This book introduces the literary and historical context of Plato's work, surveys and explains the arguments, and considers why Plato has cast this work in a highly unusual narrative form. A final chapter traces the influence of the Symposium from antiquity to the modern day.

A Companion to the Works of Alfred Döblin



A Companion to the Works of Alfred Döblin (Studies in German Literature Linguistics and Culture)

by Roland Dollinger, Wulf Koepke, Heidi Thomann Tewarson (Editors)

Alfred Döblin (1878-1957) was one of the great German-Jewish writers of the 20th century, a major figure in the German avant-garde before the First World War and a leading intellectual during the Weimar Republic. Döblin greatly influenced the history of the German novel: his best-known work, the best-selling 1929 novel Berlin Alexanderplatz, has frequently been compared in its use of internal monologue and literary montage to James Joyce's Ulysses and John Dos Passos's Manhattan Transfer . Döblin's oeuvre is by no means limited to novels, but in this genre, he offered a surprising variety of narrative techniques, themes, structures, and outlooks. Döblin's impact on German writers after the Second World War was considerable: Günter Grass, for example, acknowledged him as "my teacher." And yet, while Alexanderplatz continues to fascinate the reading public, it has overshadowed the rest of Döblin's immense oeuvre. This volume of carefully focused essays seeks to do justice to such important texts as Döblin's early stories, his numerous other novels, his political, philosophical, medical, autobiographical, and religious essays, his experimental plays, and his writings on the new media of cinema and radio.Contributors: Heidi Thomann Tewarson, David Dollenmayer, Neil H. Donahue, Roland Dollinger, Veronika Fuechtner, Gabriele Sander, Erich Kleinschmidt, Wulf Koepke, Helmut F. Pfanner, Helmuth Kiesel, Klaus Müller-Salget, Christoph Bartscherer, Wolfgang Düsing. Roland Dollinger is associate professor of German at Sarah Lawrence College; Wulf Koepke is professor emeritus of German at Texas A&M University; Heidi Thomann Tewarson is professor of German at Oberlin College.

A Companion to the Works of Thomas Mann



A Companion to the Works of Thomas Mann (Studies in German Literature Linguistics and Culture)

by Herbert Lehnert, Eva Wessell (Editors)

Thomas Mann is among the greatest of German prose writers, and was the first German novelist to reach a wide English-speaking readership since Goethe. Novels such as Buddenbrooks, The Magic Mountain, and Doktor Faustus attest to his mastery of subtle, distanced irony, while novellas such as Death in Venice reveal him at the height of his mastery of language. In addition to fresh insights about these best-known works of Mann, this volume treats less-often-discussed works such as Joseph and His Brothers, Lotte in Weimar, and Felix Krull, as well as his political writings and essays. Mann himself was a paradox: his role as family-father was both refuge and façade; his love of Germany was matched by his contempt for its having embraced Hitler. While in exile during the Nazi period, he functioned as the prime representative of the "good" Germany in the fight against fascism, and he has often been remembered this way in English-speaking lands. But a new view of Mann is emerging half a century after his death: a view of him as one of the great writers of a modernity understood as extending into our 21st century. This volume provides sixteen essays by American and European specialists. They demonstrate the relevance of his writings for our time, making particular use of the biographical material that is now available.Contributors: Ehrhard Bahr, Manfred Dierks, Werner Frizen, Clayton Koelb, Helmut Koopmann, Wolfgang Lederer, Hannelore Mundt, Peter Pütz, Jens Rieckmann, Hans Joachim Sandberg, Egon Schwarz, and Hans Vaget.Herbert Lehnert is Research Professor, and Eva Wessell is lecturer in Humanities, both at the University of California, Irvine.

C. S. Lewis: Life, Works, and Legacy



C. S. Lewis [Four Volumes]: Life, Works, and Legacy (Praeger Perspectives)

by Bruce L. Edwards (Editor)

Most popularly known as the author of the children's classic The Chronicles of Narnia, C. S. Lewis was also a prolific poet, essayist, novelist, and Christian writer. His most famous work, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, while known as a children's book is often read as a Christian allegory and remains to this day one of his best-loved works. But Lewis was prolific in a number of areas, including poetry, Christian writing, literary criticism, letters, memoir, autobiography, sermons and more. This set, written by experts, guides readers to a better understanding and appreciation of this important and influential writer. Clive Staples Lewis was born on November 29, 1898, in Belfast, Northern Ireland. His mother died when he was young, leaving his father to raise him and his older brother Warren. He fought and was wounded in World War I and later became immersed in the spiritual life of Christianity. While he delved into the world of Christian writing, he did not limit himself to one genre and produced a remarkable oeuvre that continues to be widely read, taught, and adored at all levels. As part of the circle known as the Inklings, which consisted of writers and intellectuals, and included J.R.R. Tolkien, Charles Williams, and others, he developed and honed his skills and continued to put out extensive writings. Many different groups now claim him as their own: spanning genres from science fiction to Christian literature, from nonfiction to children's stories, his output remains among the most popular and complex. Here, experts in the field of Lewis studies examine all his works along with the details of his life and the culture in which he lived to give readers the fullest complete picture of the man, the writer, and the husband, alongside his works, his legacy, and his place in English letters.

понедельник, 16 февраля 2009 г.

Cultural Theory: The Key Concepts



Cultural Theory: The Key Concepts (Routledge Key Guides)

ow in its second edition, Cultural Theory: The Key Concepts is an up-to-date and comprehensive survey of over 350 of the key terms central to cultural theory today.This second edition includes new entries on:* colonialism* cybercultur* globalisation* terrorism* visual studies.Providing clear and succinct introductions to a wide range of subjects, from feminism to postmodernism, Cultural Theory: The Key Concepts continues to be an essential resource for students of literature, sociology, philosophy and media and anyone wrestling with contemporary cultural theory.

Social and Cultural Anthropology: The Key Concepts



Social and Cultural Anthropology: The Key Concepts

Social and Cultural Anthropology: The Key Concepts is the ideal introduction to this discipline, defining and discussing its central terms with clarity and authority. Among the concepts explored are: cybernetics, ecriture, the feminine, gossip, human Rights, moralities, stereotypes, thick description, and violence. Each entry is accompanied by extensive cross-referencing and an invaluable list of suggestions for further reading.


Arete: Greek Sports from Ancient Sources



Arete: Greek Sports from Ancient Sources

by Stephen G. Miller

From the informal games of Homer's time to the highly organized contests of the Roman world, Miller has compileda trove of ancient sources: Plutarch on boxing, Aristotle on the pentathlon, Philostratos on the buying and selling of victories, Vitruvius on literary competitions, and Xenophon on female body building. With nearly 50 percent more texts than the highly successful second edition, this new version of Arete offers readers an absorbing lesson in the culture of Greek athletics from the greatest of teachers, the ancients themselves, and demonstrates that the concepts of virtue, skill, pride, valor, and nobility embedded in the word arete are only part of the story from antiquity. Illustrations: 15 line illustrations

вторник, 10 февраля 2009 г.

Seamus Heaney: Searches for Answers




Seamus Heaney: Searches for Answers

by Eugene O'Brien


Thematically arranged and clearly structured, this book explores the seminal themes in Heaney's writing: aesthetics, politics, language, identity and myth, ethics and notions of Irishness. It is the first such study of Heaney to take into account all of his writings, poetry, prose and translations in order to demonstrate that these themes are coherently developed throughout his work. The detailed reading of various aspects of Heaney's prose should prove valuable to students of his poetry, proving a depth of reference to his evolving thought processes.
A central strand of this study is an exploration of Heaney's ethical and political project with respect to issues of Irish identity as outlined in his writings. This work suggests that there are analogies between Heaney's political and ethical thought, and that of Jacques Derrida, Maurice Blanchot and Emmanuel Levinas.
Each chapter concentrates on a single theme: his sense of the aesthetic, and its role in terms of politics and ethics; his relationship with politics as a contemporary situation; his notion of place, both as a given, and as something that could be reimagined; his enunciation of a sense of visceral identity; his concept of ethics in terms of a relationship between selfhood and alterity; his notion of the many threads which combine to produce a sense of Irishness. Finally, the Nobel lectures of Yeats and Heaney are examined in order to trace the complex relationship between these two writers in terms of the ethical similarities of their views on the role of the aesthetic with respect to the politic, as well as in terms of their attitudes to the complexities of identity.

Sumerian Grammar



Sumerian Grammar (Handbook of Oriental Studies/Handbuch Der Orientalistik)by Dietz Otto Edzard

It seems safe to say that this "Sumerian Grammar by Professor D.O. Edzard will become the new classic reference in the field. It is an up-to-date, reliable guide to the language of the Sumerians, the inventors of cuneiform writing in the late 4th millennium B.C., and thus essential contributors to the high cultural standard of the whole of Mesopotamia and beyond. Following traditional lines, the "Grammar describes general characteristics, origins, linguistic environment, phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, and phraseology. Due attention is given to the symbiosis with Semitic Akkadian, with which Sumerian was toform a veritable linguistic area. With lucid explanations of all technical linguistic theory. Each transliteration carries its English translation.

Homer's Cosmic Fabrication



Homer's Cosmic Fabrication: Choice and Design in the Iliad (An American Philological Association Book)

by Bruce Heiden

Although scholars routinely state that the Iliad is an "oral poem," since very near the time of its composition the great epic has circulated as a text stabilized in writing. Thus whether or not it is in some sense "oral poetry," the Iliad undoubtedly has features that render it quite satisfactory to readers and reading. But the question of what these features might be has been difficult for modern Homeric scholarship even to frame, much less address, within the research paradigm of "oral poetics."In Homer's Cosmic Fabrication Bruce Heiden delineates a new approach aimed at evaluating what the Iliad furnishes to readers that makes it comprehensible and engaging. His program conceptualizes the act of reading as a flexible repertoire of cognitive functions that a reader might deploy in collaboration with the poem's signs. By positing certain functions hypothetically and applying them to the poem, Heiden's experiments uncover the kind and degree of suitable "reading material" the poem provides.These analyses reveal that the trajectory of events in the Iliad manifests the central agency of one character, Zeus, and that the transmitted articulation of the epic into chapter-like "books" conforms to distinct narrative subtrajectories. The analyses also show, however, that the fixed sequence of "books" functions suitably as a design that cues attention to the major crises in the story, as well as to themes that develop its significance. The transmitted arrangement therefore furnishes an implicit cognitive map that both eases comprehension of the storyline and indicates previously unexplored pathways of interpretation. Through Homer's Cosmic Fabrication enthusiasts of the Iliad will gain enhanced understanding of the epic's poetic design and the philosophical rewards it offers to thoughtful study.

воскресенье, 8 февраля 2009 г.

Deconstructing History



Deconstructing History

by Alun Munslow

Deconstructive readings of history and sources have changed the entire discipline of history. And in this second edition of Deconstructing History, Alun Munslow examines history in what he argues is a postmodern age. He provides an introduction to the debates and issues of postmodernist history. He also surveys the latest research into the relationship between the past, history, and historical practice, as well as forwarding his own challenging theories. In this fully up-to-date second edition, Munslow:
· Discusses the limits of conventional historical thinking and practice and responds to the recent critiques of authors including Kevin Passmore, Ludmilla Jordanova, and C.B. McCullagh· Assesses afresh the claims of history as a form of "truthful explanation" · Examines the arrival of "experimental history" and addresses its implications including, for example, "historiophoty"
Including a fully updated glossary and bibliography, Munslow maps the philosophical field, outlines the controversies involved and assesses the merits of the by now familiar deconstructionist position.

Jimi Hendrix: The Man, the Magic, the Truth



Jimi Hendrix: The Man, the Magic, the Truth

by Sharon Lawrence

The genius we never understood. . . . The man we never knew. . . . The truth we never heard. . . . The music we never forgot. . . . A revealing portrait of a legend by a close and trusted friend.

The Arthurian Companion




The Arthurian Companion: The Legendary World of Camelot and the Round Table (Pendragon Fiction)

by Phyllis Ann Karr


Written in a warm and entertaining style, The Arthurian Companion contains over one thousand entries, cross-referenced, annotated, and carefully revised for the second edition. It is an alphabetical guide to the "who's who" of Arthurian legend, a "what's what" of famous Arthurian weapons and artifacts, and a "where's where" of geographical locations appearing in Arthurian literature. An extensive chronology of King Arthur's reign is included. The Arthurian Companion is an invaluable reference for researchers and for lovers of medieval romance. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

пятница, 6 февраля 2009 г.

Robert Louis Stevenson: A Literary Life



Robert Louis Stevenson: A Literary Life (Literary Lives)

by William Gray
More than most writers, Robert Louis Stevenson merits a Literary Life. Fascination with Stevenson's life (the "Stevenson biography" is almost a minor genre) has tended to eclipse his literary achievement. This study focuses on Stevenson's writing practice within the different geographical, cultural and political contexts that shaped it, from Scotland to the South Seas. Following Stevenson's own views on biography, the book is not structured primarily in terms of chronology, but is more a kind of literary geography than traditional literary history.

The Indian Ocean



The Indian Ocean (Seas in History)

by Michael Pearson

In this stimulating and authoritative overview, Michael Pearson reverses the traditional angle of maritime history and looks from the sea to its shores - its impact on the land through trade, naval power, travel and scientific exploration. This vast ocean, both connecting and separating nations, has shaped many countries' cultures and ideologies through the movement of goods, people, ideas and religions across the sea.
The Indian Ocean moves from a discussion of physical elements, its shape, winds, currents and boundaries, to a history from pre-Islamic times to the modern period of European dominance. Going far beyond pure maritime history, this compelling survey is an invaluable addition to political, cultural and economic world history.

The Atlantic



The Atlantic (Seas in History)

by Paul Butel

From antiquity to modern times, the Atlantic has been the subject of myths and legends, as well as a site marked by commerce, exploration, migration, and war. The Atlantic offers a global history of the ocean encompassing the exploits of adventurers, Vikings, explorers such as Christopher Columbus, emigrants, fishermen, and modern traders. The book also highlights the importance of the growth of ports such as New York and Liverpool and the battles of the Atlantic in the world wars of the twentieth century.
Paul Butel examines the legends of the ocean, beginning with the Phoenicians and Carthaginians navigating beyond the Pillars of Hercules, and details the exploitation and power struggles of the Atlantic through the centuries. The book surveys the important events in the Atlantic's rich history and comprehensively analyzes the changing fortunes of sea-going nations, including Britain, the United States and Germany.

четверг, 5 февраля 2009 г.

Critical Companion to Dante



Critical Companion to Dante: A Literary Reference to His Life and Work

by Jay Rudd

Dante Alighieri is one of the greatest poets in world history. His brilliant epic, "The Divine Comedy", an imagined journey through Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory, continues to captivate readers. "Critical Companion to Dante" provides a reliable, up-to-date, and encyclopedic source of information on Dante's life and work for high school and college-level students, teachers, libraries, and the general public. This new title covers Dante's entire canon, including his beautiful love poems in "La Vita Nuova", his philosophical works, and much more. With a strong emphasis on "The Divine Comedy" - one of the finest literary works ever produced - this comprehensive resource also includes detailed entries on important references, influences, historical events, places, and much more, all providing essential background for the study of this master poet.Coverage of this title includes: a concise but thorough biography of Dante; synopses and critical assessments of Dante's work, including extensive coverage of the three parts of "The Divine Comedy"; descriptions of Dante's characters, such as Paolo and Francesca, Virgil, and more; related people, places, and topics, including friends and literary influences, historical events that shaped Dante's work, themes and symbols, and more; and, appendixes, including a chronology, a bibliography of Dante's works, and a secondary source bibliography.

Critical Companion to William Faulkner



Critical Companion to William Faulkner: A Literary Reference to His Life And Work

by A. Nicholas Fargnoli, Michael Golay, Robert W. Hamblin (Authors)

This comprehensive companion to Faulkner contains a variety of information for the student as well as being a handy reference to Faulkner's life and works for those curious about him. Fargnoli (theology and English, Molloy College, NY) Golay (history, Phillips Exeter Academy) and Hamblin (English, Center for Faulkner Studies, Southeast Missouri State University) begin with a short biography of Faulkner and his family. They note how his childhood and family history influenced his stories, as well as his emotional make up and alcoholic tendencies. The is followed by an annotated list of all Faulkner's short stories and novels with a synopsis, character list and excerpts from reviews. There is also a dictionary of subjects associated with Faulkner, from Civil War battles and generals to his publishers, fellow writers, his themes and friends such as Humphrey Bogart. Lastly the editors give a list of biographical works and literary studies for the serious scholar to consult.

Mosaics of Hagia Sophia, Istanbul



Mosaics of Hagia Sophia, Istanbul: The Fossati Restoration and the Work of the Byzantine Institute (Dumbarton Oaks Other Titles in Byzantine Studies)

by Natalia B. Teteriatnikov

Drawing on material in the Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Photograph and Fieldwork Archives, this catalogue records two periods of work that uncovered the mosaics of Hagia Sophia, hidden by whitewash and plaster for 400 years. The photographs and drawings record the procedures used in the restoration and the results of these projects carried out in 1848-49 by the architects Gaspare and Giuseppe Fossati and later in 1931-49 by the Byzantine Institute.

среда, 4 февраля 2009 г.

Gregory Nagy - Homeric Responses




Homeric Responses

by Gregory Nagy


In Homeric Responses, Nagy presents a series of essays that further elaborate his theories regarding the oral composition and evolution of the Homeric epics. Building on his previous work in Homeric Questions and Poetry as Performance: Homer and Beyond and responding to some of his critics, he examines such issues as the importance of performance and the interaction between audience and poet in shaping the poetry; the role of the rhapsode (the performer of the poems) in the composition and transmission of the poetry; the "irreversible mistakes" and cross-references in the Iliad and Odyssey as evidences of artistic creativity; and the Iliadic description of the shield of Achilles as a pointer to the world outside the poem, the polis of the audience.

Gregory Nagy - Homeric Questions



Homeric Questions

by Gregory Nagy

The "Homeric Question" has vexed Classicists for generations. Was the author of the Iliad and the Odyssey a single individual who created the poems at a particular moment in history? Or does the name "Homer" hide the shaping influence of the epic tradition during a long period of oral composition and transmission? In this innovative investigation, Gregory Nagy applies the insights of comparative linguistics and anthropology to offer a new historical model for understanding how, when, where, and why the Iliad and the Odyssey were ultimately preserved as written texts that could be handed down over two millennia. His model draws on the comparative evidence provided by living oral epic traditions, in which each performance of a song often involves a recomposition of the narrative. This evidence suggests that the written texts emerged from an evolutionary process in which composition, performance, and diffusion interacted to create the epics we know as the Iliad and the Odyssey. Sure to challenge orthodox views and provoke lively debate, Nagy's book will be essential reading for all students of oral traditions.

понедельник, 2 февраля 2009 г.

Joseph Conrad (The Critical Heritage Series)



Joseph Conrad (The Critical Heritage Series)

by Normand Sherry

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924). Polish born, learnt English from scratch when he arrived in Britain. Writings include: Heart of Darkness, The Secret Agent, Nostromo. Volume covers the period 1895 - 1993. Includes Conrad's responses to his critics.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (Critical Heritage Series)



Nathaniel Hawthorne (Critical Heritage Series)

by Donald Crowley

Gr 8 Up--Essays by noted critics and scholars, prefaced by short, fairly comprehensive author biographies. Steinbeck includes several general critical selections, thus providing an overview of the author's work followed by several entries on each of the following novels: The Red Pony, The Pearl, Of Mice and Men, and The Grapes of Wrath. Hawthorne includes essays on the author's subject matter and resources; discussions of short story and novel literary techniques; and four essays on The Scarlet Letter. These volumes compare favorably to Twayne's essay collections; there is little overlap. Essay selections, although not identical passages, have appeared in Contemporary Literary Criticism (Gale) or elsewhere. Swisher's volumes provide concise resources that would require consultation of several volumes of those books or scanning through multiple pages of American Writers (Scribners) to find comparable material. For students and general readers, these accessible collections provide excellent information on American authors and literary works that are de rigueur in high-school curricula.

Marcel Proust (Critical Heritage)



Marcel Proust (Critical Heritage)

by Leighton Hodson (Editor)

Collected for the first time in English are reviews, notices and essays on the entire Proust canon from 1896 to 1931. It includes new translations of the French and many previously little known articles. This book should be of interest to advanced students of French and comparative literature.

Mendelssohn: A Life in Music



Mendelssohn: A Life in Music

by R. Larry Todd

An extraordinary prodigy of Mozartean abilities, Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy was a distinguished composer and conductor, a legendary pianist and organist, and an accomplished painter and classicist. Lionized in his lifetime, he is best remembered today for several staples of the concert hall and for such popular music as "The Wedding March" and "Hark, the Herald Angels Sing." Now, in the first major Mendelssohn biography to appear in decades, R. Larry Todd offers a remarkably fresh account of this musical giant, based upon painstaking research in autograph manuscripts, correspondence, diaries, and paintings. Rejecting the view of the composer as a craftsman of felicitous but sentimental, saccharine works (termed by one critic "moonlight with sugar water"), Todd reexamines the composer's entire oeuvre, including many unpublished and little known works. Here are engaging analyses of Mendelssohn's distinctive masterpieces--the zestful Octet, puckish Midsummer Night's Dream, haunting Hebrides Overtures, and elegiac Violin Concerto in E minor. Todd describes how the composer excelled in understatement and nuance, in subtle, coloristic orchestrations that lent his scores an undeniable freshness and vividness. He also explores Mendelssohn's changing awareness of his religious heritage, Wagner's virulent anti-Semitic attack on Mendelssohn's music, the composer's complex relationship with his sister Fanny Hensel, herself a child prodigy and prolific composer, his avocation as a painter and draughtsman, and his remarkable, polylingual correspondence with the cultural elite of his time. Mendelssohn: A Life offers a masterful blend of biography and musical analysis. Readers will discover many new facets of the familiar but misunderstood composer and gain new perspectives on one of the most formidable musical geniuses of all time.

воскресенье, 1 февраля 2009 г.

Mantike: Studies in Ancient Divination




Mantike: Studies in Ancient Divination (Religions in the Graeco-Roman World)

by Sarah Iles Johnston, Peter T. Struck


This book thoroughly revisits divination as a central phenomenon in the lives of ancient Greeks, Romans, and Egyptians. It collects studies from many periods in Graeco-Roman history, from the Archaic period to the late Roman, and touches on many different areas of this rich topic, including treatments of dice oracles, sortition in both pagan and Christian contexts, the overlap between divination and other interpretive practices in antiquity, the fortunes of independent diviners, the activity of Delphi in ordering relations with the dead, the role of Egyptian cult centers in divinatory practices, and the surreptitious survival of recipes for divination by corpses. It also reflects a ranges of methodologies, drawn from anthropology, history of religions, intellectual history, literary studies, and archaeology, epigraphy, and paleography. It will be of particular interest to scholars and student of ancient Mediterranean religions.

Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek




Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek, Vol. 1-2

by Maurice Balme, Gilbert Lawall

Combining the best features of traditional and modern methods, Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek, 2/e, provides a unique course of instruction that allows students to read connected Greek narrative right from the beginning and guides them to the point where they can begin reading complete classical texts. Carefully designed to hold students' interest, the course begins in Book I with a fictional narrative about an Attic farmer's family placed in a precise historical context (432-431 B.C.). This narrative, interwoven with tales from mythology and the Persian Wars, gradually gives way in Book II to adapted passages from Thucydides, Plato, and Herodotus and ultimately to excerpts of the original Greek of Bacchylides, Thucydides, and Aristophanes' Acharnians. Essays on relevant aspects of ancient Greek culture and history are also provided. New to the Second Edition: * Short passages from Classical and New Testament Greek in virtually every chapter * The opening lines of the Iliad and the Odyssey toward the end of Book II * New vocabulary and more complete explanations of grammar, including material on accents * Many new exercises and additional opportunities for students to practice completing charts of verb forms and paradigms of nouns and adjectives * Updated Teacher's Handbooks for Books I and II containing translations of all stories, readings, and exercises; detailed suggestions for classroom presentation; abundant English derivatives; and additional linguistic information * Offered for the first time, Student Workbooks for Books I and II that include self-correcting exercises, cumulative vocabulary lists, periodic grammatical reviews, and additional readings

The Art of the Franciscan Order in Italy



The Art of the Franciscan Order in Italy (The Medieval Franciscans)

by William R. Cook

This volume of essays, by a group of scholars from the United States and Great Britain, presents a panoramic look at the study of Franciscan art in late medieval and early Renaissance Italy. In addition to being important case studies, the articles suggest a range of methodologies and interdisciplinary perspectives on important works of art. Senior scholars who have worked in the field for decades are joined by a new generation of researchers in the field. New studies of the Basilica in Assisi as well as innovative looks at early panel paintings and Franciscan stained glass are included. Those who study the Franciscan tradition as well as art historians, historians, literary critics, and theologians will find the studies relevant to their work. Contributors: Donal Cooper; Janet Robson; Daniel T. Michaels; Marilyn Lavin; Thomas De Wesselow; Beth Mulvaney; Ronald B. Herzman; Gregory W. Ahlquist; William R. Cook; Nancy M. Thompson.